How do I start?


If you’ve never hiked before, it’s just like anything else. Start slow and try things out. By starting with shorter distances, you’ll get to learn yourself and how you can plan for longer hikes, based on your own needs. How far can you walk in a day? How far do you walk in hour? How much food do you need? Is there anything in your pack that you can get rid of? Something that is worth a little extra money in your opinion? How much can you carry? How easily do you get cold? A good idea is to make some notes before and after your hike. That will make it easier to remember how it was until the next time.

Basically you start like this,

1. Choose where and how far you want to hike. Read about finding a trail here.

Where will you start and where will you go? Are you going in a loop, meaning that your start and finish point is at the same place, or are you going from point a to point b? How do you get there/from there? How far is it?

2. Estimate how long your hiking will take from how far you’ll walk.

How long will you be out, a day or more? Where can you camp or take a break? Have in mind that it takes much longer to walk a stretch in nature than on a street, especially if you have a heavy pack.

3. When you know how far you’ll go and how long you’ll be out, you can start planning what you should bring. Read more about packing here.

4. Tell someone that you’re going on a hike, where you will go and how long you’ve planned to be out for.

5. Get out and hike!

Start with a day trip. Then you won’t need anything more than comfortable well used shoes, clothes by weather and a bag with a warmer sweater/jacket, a raincoat/poncho, water, snacks and some food if you want. Take what you have, you don’t have to buy anything new for this. Keep an eye on the weather forecast and choose, if possible, a day with good weather. If it’s your first hike, don’t over do it and walk to far. A walk in the woods is way harder and takes longer than a walk in town.

Day trips is a good way of getting experience before you set out on a longer hike. You’ll find out what speed you are keeping, how far you walk in an hour and how much extra energy you need meantime. Get yourself a map over the area and learn how to read it in a safe condition. You can also get a compass and learn that as well. Ask in the store if they can show you how to use it right.

First camping night. When you feel like it’s time to try a longer distance and spending one night outside, your pack will immediately start to grow. Now you’ll need someplace to stay, something to sleep in and someway to make food. And more and heavier stuff needs a bigger pack. See if you can borrow a pack from someone in your family or from a friend. Some stores even rent out there packs or you can buy one second hand. Wait a while to make more expensive purchases until you know what you want from the products.

First multiple days hike. A multiple day hike isn’t that much different than a hike with just one night out. The difference would be the size of your packing, since you’ll need more food. But you also need to plan your hike more carefully. Mark your day marches on your map and where you plan to camp. Then you won’t have to worry about that on the trail. But of course you can decide to camp somewhere else if you find a really good spot along the trail. It’s just good to have a plan before you get out. Keep an eye on the weather forecast and make sure you have a plan b, just incase something unpredictable should happen. If you’ll be going deep into the wilderness, especially if your hiking in the mountains, you should do a risk analysis over the area and check so there’s no restrictions where and when you’ll be hiking.

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Me who runs the blog

... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

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It’s easy to forget, that when climbing a mountain, reaching the top means that you’re only halfway through your climb. The way down can be at least as heard (or sometimes even harder) than they way up. This is important to keep in mind when climbing. This and much more will be part of my talk about Kilimanjaro at @naturkompaniet (Hantverkargatan) in Stockholm tonight at 18.30! Drop by if your interested in learning more! ☀️
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Pic from my descent of Kilimanjaro in March with Mt. Meru in the background. Maybe I’ll climb that too next time... 😁
#mykilimanjarostory .
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#mountkilimanjaro #kilimanjaro #mykilimanjaroadventure #climbingmountains #mtmeru #futuregoals #dreambig #neverstopexploring
Uhuru Peak - The top of Kilimanjaro - is located 5895 meters above sea level and is the highest point of Africa, which also makes Kilimanjaro one of the #sevensummits .
Uhuru means ‘freedom’ in Swahili and the peak got its name when Tanzania was declared a independent country in 1964. 🇹🇿 #mykilimanjarostory
The last stretch to the top of Kilimanjaro. To the right you can see the people surrounding the monument that marks the summit and to the left you can see the southern icefields. Once, the glacier reached all the way to the trail but now it’s far away. Scientists predict the glaciers on Kilimanjaro will be all gone by 2060. It’s sad that even on such a remote place as the top of Africa, you want to get away from the effects of global warming...💔
#mykilimanjarostory
Right. Left. Right. Left. Right...
The last stretch up to the top of Kilimanjaro after Stella Point sure was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done and all I could think of was my next step.  I’ve never been so captured in the moment and at the same time so stubborn to not giving up. 
Luckily I was once or twice able manage to remember to pic up my phone and take some pictures. This is one of the few I have from the last stretch to the top.
#mykilimanjarostory #nevernevernevergiveup #iphonephotography
Mawenzi Peak, the third of the three volcanoes that is part of the Kilimanjaro massive. With its 5149 meters above sea level, it’s not only the second highest point on Kilimanjaro, it’s also the third highest point in Africa! (After Kilimanjaro’s Uhuru Peak and Mt Kenya.) Pic from the crater rim just an hour or so after sunrise.
#mykilimanjarostory
Did you know that you can get a certificate that you climbed Kilimanjaro even if you don’t get to the top? If you’re reaching Gilman’s Point at 5685m (only passed if you’re doing the Rongai or Marangu Route) or Stella Point at 5756m, you also get one. The golden summit certificate you only get if you make it all the way to Uhuru Peak at 5895m though. .
For me the hardest stretch on the summit day was up to Stella Point. After that the trail gets much less steep and the fact that you can actually see the Uhuru Peak makes the rest of the climb - I wouldn’t say easy, but at least - much easier. Getting to this point also felt really good, it was here that I for the first time knew that I was gonna make it!
#mykilimanjarostory
Sunrise seen from Kilimanjaro during my summit push.
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When you’re climbing a mountain, it’s normal to start your summit attempt very early in the morning. On Kilimanjaro, I started at midnight!
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So why start so early in the middle of the night?
🗻The climb from base camp and back took about 11 hours and you wanna do this while the snow and ground is still frozen and hard. That makes it easy to walk on and you won’t have to worry about sliding around. 🗻The sun and heat is also a reason. The air is thin on the top and once the sun has rised it can be very hot - but you still need to cover yourself to not get burned. 🗻A third reason is that you get to watch the magic sunrise from the top of Africa. Maybe the best reason of them all. 😍
#mykilimanjarostory
One of the most well known plants on Kilimanjaro is the groundsel Dendrosenecio. Walking down in the fog from Lava Tower, these gigantic plants appeared for the first time on the Machame Route and they felt both spooky and so pretty at the same time.💕
#mykilimanjarostory
Patience - one of the most valuable traits of a hiker or climber.
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Yesterday I gave some advice to a guy that hikes the PCT this year. After just 40 miles in he started complaining about his shoes. That he got blisters and wanted new ones. My best advice to him was to take some days off and then continue forward and not do too many miles a day. To let his body slowly adapt to the new conditions. Not buying new shoes. .
The same is it with altitude. There is no easy solution. To be able to handle it, you have to let you’re body slowly adapt to the new altitude and the less amount of oxygen it gets.
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Climbing Kilimanjaro can be hard because many of the routes are done in few days. One benefit with choosing the Machame Route is that you get one acclimatization day on your way up. After Shira Cave Camp (3750m) you go up to Lava Tower at 4600m before you’re heading down to your next camp, Barranco camp at 3900m. This gives you’re body time to adjust to the altitude and increases the odds making it to the top!
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This pic is from my way up to Lava Tower. I was lucky to have snow there which is not always the case! Can you see the small people in the lower left corner?!
#mykilimanjarostory

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