Food


a gas stove and camping food

An essential issue when you’re gonna be out for days is your food and how you’re gonna cook it. The more days you’ll be spending on the trail, the more food you’ll need. You can of course bring both pots and frying pans together with all ingredients you need to cook your dinner from scratch. But if you’re gonna be out for days and on top of that, also gonna walk long distances with your pack every day, its a smart move to try to keep the weight and volume down to a minimum.

When

Just as when you’re at home, its good to eat often and regularly. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper, together with some snacks in between. But it’s also important to adapt it after your own hiking. Take me for example, I’m eating a big breakfast, then I’m just filling up with energy (nuts, chocolate, bars, fruits) during the day when I feel like and then I’ll have a big dinner when I’ve put up my tent in the evening. I also eat something simple, just before I’m going to sleep. But I always bring something that I can have for lunch if I want to one day. Like if it’s going to be bad weather during the day, it can be nice to stop and make some lunch and get protection from the rain. Well, basically it’s the same as with everything else, try out what works best for you on shorter trips first.

How

Theres many different kinds of stoves. There’s the old fashioned Trangia stove that runs on alcohol, but its quite big and heavy. The alcohol also weights a lot itself. Then there’s the alternative to cook over open fire, but for that you need dry wood and a safe place to make your campfire upon (and that it is not prohibited at the time for your hike). But if this isn’t a problem, or if a Trangia stove is what you got, then just go for it.

I use a gas stove and I really recommend that. For that you need a gas canister and a small burner that you screw on top of the canister. I also have a wind shield and a lightweight pot with folding handles and a lid. I only boil water in the pot, so I also bring a cup/bowl made of soft plastic in which I cook my food.

What

Freeze dried food is with no doubt the easiest way of cooking on the trail. You don’t have to carry the water that normal food contains, which saves you both weight and volume in your pack, but its also very easy to cook. You just boil water and then pour it over the food, stir and wait till it’s done.

You can buy ready made freeze dried meals in store. They are great but they cost some money, so an alternative is to make your own at home. Walk around in your grocery store, what kind of dried food do you find? Dried tomatoes, mushrooms, fruit, nuts, milk powder, noodles, soup, bouillon cubes, spices, sausages etc. You can also dry your own food in your oven. Let your imagination flow and experiment at home. When you come up with a good recipe, just mix the ingredients, put them in a zip lock bag, press the air out and zip it. Once you’re out and it’s time to eat, pour over the ingredients in a bowl/cup together with boiled water, stir and wait, like you do with the ready made meals. If you want to get tips on recipes, you’ll find some here.

Coffee is important for many and for some reason the outdoor stores suggest us to bring a coffee pot. Instant coffee is much easier. Take as much you think you’ll need and keep it in double small plastic bags.

Nuts, raisins or other dried fruit are good options for snacks, but also energy bars. A good bar for hikers is snickers! What’s most important is that you bring something you like and won’t get tired of so that you really eat the energy when you need it!

To think of

At home there are many of us who try to keep to a low calorie diet. On a hike you need to think the opposite way. When you’re walking almost all day and carrying a heavy pack you burn a lot of calories, so you’ll need much more calories than you do a day at home. So try to find food that is high in calories, but don’t forget the proteins, salts and fats as well. A tip is to bring a small plastic bottle of olive oil. It contains about 85kcal/tablespoon, so it’s an easy way to add extra calories and it will also make your food taste better!

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Me who runs the blog

... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

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It’s easy to forget, that when climbing a mountain, reaching the top means that you’re only halfway through your climb. The way down can be at least as heard (or sometimes even harder) than they way up. This is important to keep in mind when climbing. This and much more will be part of my talk about Kilimanjaro at @naturkompaniet (Hantverkargatan) in Stockholm tonight at 18.30! Drop by if your interested in learning more! ☀️
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Pic from my descent of Kilimanjaro in March with Mt. Meru in the background. Maybe I’ll climb that too next time... 😁
#mykilimanjarostory .
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#mountkilimanjaro #kilimanjaro #mykilimanjaroadventure #climbingmountains #mtmeru #futuregoals #dreambig #neverstopexploring
Uhuru Peak - The top of Kilimanjaro - is located 5895 meters above sea level and is the highest point of Africa, which also makes Kilimanjaro one of the #sevensummits .
Uhuru means ‘freedom’ in Swahili and the peak got its name when Tanzania was declared a independent country in 1964. 🇹🇿 #mykilimanjarostory
The last stretch to the top of Kilimanjaro. To the right you can see the people surrounding the monument that marks the summit and to the left you can see the southern icefields. Once, the glacier reached all the way to the trail but now it’s far away. Scientists predict the glaciers on Kilimanjaro will be all gone by 2060. It’s sad that even on such a remote place as the top of Africa, you want to get away from the effects of global warming...💔
#mykilimanjarostory
Right. Left. Right. Left. Right...
The last stretch up to the top of Kilimanjaro after Stella Point sure was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done and all I could think of was my next step.  I’ve never been so captured in the moment and at the same time so stubborn to not giving up. 
Luckily I was once or twice able manage to remember to pic up my phone and take some pictures. This is one of the few I have from the last stretch to the top.
#mykilimanjarostory #nevernevernevergiveup #iphonephotography
Mawenzi Peak, the third of the three volcanoes that is part of the Kilimanjaro massive. With its 5149 meters above sea level, it’s not only the second highest point on Kilimanjaro, it’s also the third highest point in Africa! (After Kilimanjaro’s Uhuru Peak and Mt Kenya.) Pic from the crater rim just an hour or so after sunrise.
#mykilimanjarostory
Did you know that you can get a certificate that you climbed Kilimanjaro even if you don’t get to the top? If you’re reaching Gilman’s Point at 5685m (only passed if you’re doing the Rongai or Marangu Route) or Stella Point at 5756m, you also get one. The golden summit certificate you only get if you make it all the way to Uhuru Peak at 5895m though. .
For me the hardest stretch on the summit day was up to Stella Point. After that the trail gets much less steep and the fact that you can actually see the Uhuru Peak makes the rest of the climb - I wouldn’t say easy, but at least - much easier. Getting to this point also felt really good, it was here that I for the first time knew that I was gonna make it!
#mykilimanjarostory
Sunrise seen from Kilimanjaro during my summit push.
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When you’re climbing a mountain, it’s normal to start your summit attempt very early in the morning. On Kilimanjaro, I started at midnight!
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So why start so early in the middle of the night?
🗻The climb from base camp and back took about 11 hours and you wanna do this while the snow and ground is still frozen and hard. That makes it easy to walk on and you won’t have to worry about sliding around. 🗻The sun and heat is also a reason. The air is thin on the top and once the sun has rised it can be very hot - but you still need to cover yourself to not get burned. 🗻A third reason is that you get to watch the magic sunrise from the top of Africa. Maybe the best reason of them all. 😍
#mykilimanjarostory
One of the most well known plants on Kilimanjaro is the groundsel Dendrosenecio. Walking down in the fog from Lava Tower, these gigantic plants appeared for the first time on the Machame Route and they felt both spooky and so pretty at the same time.💕
#mykilimanjarostory
Patience - one of the most valuable traits of a hiker or climber.
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Yesterday I gave some advice to a guy that hikes the PCT this year. After just 40 miles in he started complaining about his shoes. That he got blisters and wanted new ones. My best advice to him was to take some days off and then continue forward and not do too many miles a day. To let his body slowly adapt to the new conditions. Not buying new shoes. .
The same is it with altitude. There is no easy solution. To be able to handle it, you have to let you’re body slowly adapt to the new altitude and the less amount of oxygen it gets.
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Climbing Kilimanjaro can be hard because many of the routes are done in few days. One benefit with choosing the Machame Route is that you get one acclimatization day on your way up. After Shira Cave Camp (3750m) you go up to Lava Tower at 4600m before you’re heading down to your next camp, Barranco camp at 3900m. This gives you’re body time to adjust to the altitude and increases the odds making it to the top!
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This pic is from my way up to Lava Tower. I was lucky to have snow there which is not always the case! Can you see the small people in the lower left corner?!
#mykilimanjarostory

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