Food


a gas stove and camping food

An essential issue when you’re gonna be out for days is your food and how you’re gonna cook it. The more days you’ll be spending on the trail, the more food you’ll need. You can of course bring both pots and frying pans together with all ingredients you need to cook your dinner from scratch. But if you’re gonna be out for days and on top of that, also gonna walk long distances with your pack every day, its a smart move to try to keep the weight and volume down to a minimum.

When

Just as when you’re at home, its good to eat often and regularly. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper, together with some snacks in between. But it’s also important to adapt it after your own hiking. Take me for example, I’m eating a big breakfast, then I’m just filling up with energy (nuts, chocolate, bars, fruits) during the day when I feel like and then I’ll have a big dinner when I’ve put up my tent in the evening. I also eat something simple, just before I’m going to sleep. But I always bring something that I can have for lunch if I want to one day. Like if it’s going to be bad weather during the day, it can be nice to stop and make some lunch and get protection from the rain. Well, basically it’s the same as with everything else, try out what works best for you on shorter trips first.

How

Theres many different kinds of stoves. There’s the old fashioned Trangia stove that runs on alcohol, but its quite big and heavy. The alcohol also weights a lot itself. Then there’s the alternative to cook over open fire, but for that you need dry wood and a safe place to make your campfire upon (and that it is not prohibited at the time for your hike). But if this isn’t a problem, or if a Trangia stove is what you got, then just go for it.

I use a gas stove and I really recommend that. For that you need a gas canister and a small burner that you screw on top of the canister. I also have a wind shield and a lightweight pot with folding handles and a lid. I only boil water in the pot, so I also bring a cup/bowl made of soft plastic in which I cook my food.

What

Freeze dried food is with no doubt the easiest way of cooking on the trail. You don’t have to carry the water that normal food contains, which saves you both weight and volume in your pack, but its also very easy to cook. You just boil water and then pour it over the food, stir and wait till it’s done.

You can buy ready made freeze dried meals in store. They are great but they cost some money, so an alternative is to make your own at home. Walk around in your grocery store, what kind of dried food do you find? Dried tomatoes, mushrooms, fruit, nuts, milk powder, noodles, soup, bouillon cubes, spices, sausages etc. You can also dry your own food in your oven. Let your imagination flow and experiment at home. When you come up with a good recipe, just mix the ingredients, put them in a zip lock bag, press the air out and zip it. Once you’re out and it’s time to eat, pour over the ingredients in a bowl/cup together with boiled water, stir and wait, like you do with the ready made meals. If you want to get tips on recipes, you’ll find some here.

Coffee is important for many and for some reason the outdoor stores suggest us to bring a coffee pot. Instant coffee is much easier. Take as much you think you’ll need and keep it in double small plastic bags.

Nuts, raisins or other dried fruit are good options for snacks, but also energy bars. A good bar for hikers is snickers! What’s most important is that you bring something you like and won’t get tired of so that you really eat the energy when you need it!

To think of

At home there are many of us who try to keep to a low calorie diet. On a hike you need to think the opposite way. When you’re walking almost all day and carrying a heavy pack you burn a lot of calories, so you’ll need much more calories than you do a day at home. So try to find food that is high in calories, but don’t forget the proteins, salts and fats as well. A tip is to bring a small plastic bottle of olive oil. It contains about 85kcal/tablespoon, so it’s an easy way to add extra calories and it will also make your food taste better!

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Me who runs the blog

... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

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I dit it! Lobuche Peak, 6119m ✔️❤️ One thing that I've learned through my adventures is how much of our physical strength that is actually mental. We think that we can't do something and therefor we can't. We give up before we have even tried. If we only would dare to try we would be surprised how much we're actually capable of.

One thing that I really wanted to do during my trip to Nepal was climbing a mountain. I picked Lobuche Peak at 6119m, just around the corner from Everest. I had never climbed such a big mountain before, but I really wanted to give it a try.

Unfortunately, 5 weeks before my trip started I had to go through surgery for cervical cell changes. It was not a big thing, but I was told I wasn't aloud to do any kind of training the before my trip in order for my body to heal properly.

This was of course devastating for me. To be able to handle the lower amount of oxygen over 6000m I was in the middle of a really intense workout schedule.  Now I had to stop.

I asked myself what should I do. Should I cancel the plans of climbing the mountain and forget about my dream? I decided not to. I wanted to see how far my own will could take me up the mountain even if I wasn't in the best physical shape.

And this morning I got the answer - my will took me all the way to the top! Such an amazing feeling standing there realizing how much I'm actually capable of, just if I put my mind to it! 💥
The view from this mornings climb to Kala Patthar, 5550 m, was totally amazing! A 360 view over all the peaks around during the time of sunrise. 
In this pic: one of my absolute favorites, Ama Dablam. ❤️ A good advice for all of you planning doing Kala Patthar yourself: dress warm and don't forget extra warm socks and gloves. It's freezing before the sun hits you (which might take a while since it rises behind the highest mountain in the world)!
I made it!!! 💟
All the way from Jiri through the Nepalese jungle, up and pass Lukla and finally through the rocky landscape to Everest Base Camp at 5364m! This i did all on my own, without any help from porters or guides or even the company of friends. 12 days, 182 km and I don't now how many meters of altitudes in total. Feel so proud and happy right now! ❤️💪 But my adventure isn't over yet. Tomorrow I will climb Kala Patthar and the day after that I'll head up to Lobuche high camp from where I will attempt to summit the over 6000m Lobuche Peak! Check out my Instagram story feed to see how it goes! 😘
Today I felt the altitude in a bad way for the first time. After reaching the village of Lobuche my head started aching real bad, but after some rest, water and a short hike up to higher altitude and then back down again I felt much better! It's amazing how your body can adapt if you just gives it time. ❤️
Pic from the short hike with rests of the Khumbu Glacier in the background.
Tomorrow I'm heading up for base camp! 🏔️
Today I walked higher than I ever been before, up to 5090m! Everything went well (even though it was hard) and it feels very good since Everest Base Camp is "only" about 274 m higher!
Now I'm back in Dingboche at 4400m. The hike today was part of the acclimatizing process where you slowly expose your body to higher altitudes. By going up, then back down again your body will find it easier next time you go higher.
Pic from the top of the climb today with views over Ama Dablam.
Today's hike up to Dingboche was very different than the hike yesterday. The clouds were low, the rain kept pouring down and the huge mountains that's surrounds me did not show all. But it was still so beautiful!
As the trail kept getting higher and higher, the landscape changed as well, from green rhododendron forests to rocky and sandy with less and less vegetation. It certainly feels that I'm getting higher. Now at 4400m I'm close to higher than I ever been before.
These guys are so strong. I sometimes struggling with my 15 kg+ back pack (even though I start to get use to it by now) but the porters here carry well over 50 kg, often walking in just plain sandals.
It makes me think about how worried we westerners are about weight and that we have "the right" kind of gear. It seems pretty clear that what you have works just fine - so don't let the lack of proper gear stopping you from getting out in nature!
Getting up early is definitely something that will be rewarding at the Everest Base Camp Trek. You will get clear skies = beautiful views before the clouds comes in, the temperature will be cooler and you can also get the trail for yourself if you're lucky!
Today's hike up to Tengboche was really something else, this is hiking at its best! ☀️
The Everest Base Camp Trek is hiked by tens of thousands each year. The trail between Jiri and Lukla only by a thousand. And it really was something else. I didn't meet many hikers at all, but one of the days I was happy to get company by this cutie. She followed me for hours before she suddenly decided to go back to where she came from. A man told me she use to follow hikers to make sure they not get lost. ❤️

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