Food


a gas stove and camping food

An essential issue when you’re gonna be out for days is your food and how you’re gonna cook it. The more days you’ll be spending on the trail, the more food you’ll need. You can of course bring both pots and frying pans together with all ingredients you need to cook your dinner from scratch. But if you’re gonna be out for days and on top of that, also gonna walk long distances with your pack every day, its a smart move to try to keep the weight and volume down to a minimum.

When

Just as when you’re at home, its good to eat often and regularly. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper, together with some snacks in between. But it’s also important to adapt it after your own hiking. Take me for example, I’m eating a big breakfast, then I’m just filling up with energy (nuts, chocolate, bars, fruits) during the day when I feel like and then I’ll have a big dinner when I’ve put up my tent in the evening. I also eat something simple, just before I’m going to sleep. But I always bring something that I can have for lunch if I want to one day. Like if it’s going to be bad weather during the day, it can be nice to stop and make some lunch and get protection from the rain. Well, basically it’s the same as with everything else, try out what works best for you on shorter trips first.

How

Theres many different kinds of stoves. There’s the old fashioned Trangia stove that runs on alcohol, but its quite big and heavy. The alcohol also weights a lot itself. Then there’s the alternative to cook over open fire, but for that you need dry wood and a safe place to make your campfire upon (and that it is not prohibited at the time for your hike). But if this isn’t a problem, or if a Trangia stove is what you got, then just go for it.

I use a gas stove and I really recommend that. For that you need a gas canister and a small burner that you screw on top of the canister. I also have a wind shield and a lightweight pot with folding handles and a lid. I only boil water in the pot, so I also bring a cup/bowl made of soft plastic in which I cook my food.

What

Freeze dried food is with no doubt the easiest way of cooking on the trail. You don’t have to carry the water that normal food contains, which saves you both weight and volume in your pack, but its also very easy to cook. You just boil water and then pour it over the food, stir and wait till it’s done.

You can buy ready made freeze dried meals in store. They are great but they cost some money, so an alternative is to make your own at home. Walk around in your grocery store, what kind of dried food do you find? Dried tomatoes, mushrooms, fruit, nuts, milk powder, noodles, soup, bouillon cubes, spices, sausages etc. You can also dry your own food in your oven. Let your imagination flow and experiment at home. When you come up with a good recipe, just mix the ingredients, put them in a zip lock bag, press the air out and zip it. Once you’re out and it’s time to eat, pour over the ingredients in a bowl/cup together with boiled water, stir and wait, like you do with the ready made meals. If you want to get tips on recipes, you’ll find some here.

Coffee is important for many and for some reason the outdoor stores suggest us to bring a coffee pot. Instant coffee is much easier. Take as much you think you’ll need and keep it in double small plastic bags.

Nuts, raisins or other dried fruit are good options for snacks, but also energy bars. A good bar for hikers is snickers! What’s most important is that you bring something you like and won’t get tired of so that you really eat the energy when you need it!

To think of

At home there are many of us who try to keep to a low calorie diet. On a hike you need to think the opposite way. When you’re walking almost all day and carrying a heavy pack you burn a lot of calories, so you’ll need much more calories than you do a day at home. So try to find food that is high in calories, but don’t forget the proteins, salts and fats as well. A tip is to bring a small plastic bottle of olive oil. It contains about 85kcal/tablespoon, so it’s an easy way to add extra calories and it will also make your food taste better!

Me who runs the blog

... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

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Someone once asked me if I didn't loose track of the days hiking the PCT. My answer was 'No, it was actually the opposite, I could easily recall the days, even months back. We just didn't call them by the name we use in "normal life". In the wild we simply referred to them after what made them special.' This is for example a pic from "Fog Day" (or as all the others would call it, May 6) last year. 
PCT, mile ~426
How do you prepare for a hike on a trail you never been on before? Read about my second step in my preparation for Everest Base Camp trek: Setting a time schedule, at wilderness-stories.com (link in bio)
Pic from PCT mile ~1973, in one of the weirdest landscapes I've ever seen: the lava fields in Oregon.
Passing the 2600-mile marker on the PCT was a big thing for me. Being the last 100-marker with only 50 mile to go it was clear that I was gonna complete the entire trail. Now I've seen that I've also passed 2600 followers here on Instagram! I'm so happy for all of you and that you want to follow me on my adventures! Hearing from you, meeting you and hear your own stories is what keeps me going - so from the bottom I'm my heart, THANK YOU! ❤️
One year ago today, on June 5th 2016, I summited my very first mountain, Mount Whitney on a side trail of the PCT. With its 14505 ft / 4421 meter it counts as the highest mountain in the "lower 48" (the U.S. except the 2 states of Alaska and Hawaii). It was a bit tricky in the snow, but we all made it! I know there's a lot more snow in the Sierras this year so I wish all the thruhikers of 2017 all the best and also want to send them a reminder to stay safe. If Whitney feels to risky when you pass it, you can always do it later. The mountains won't go anywhere. ❤️
If you have a dream or something you really want to do, it can be a little bit scary to make it happen. We make up ideas about why now isn't the right time, why it's better to do it later. But the truth is that there's no better time than right now. Don't push forward your dreams. Make them happen. ☀️
Me after my first full day of kayaking last week. It was a bit scary and on this pic I'm super tired but so happy at the same time because I finally did it! And it was so much fun!
If there's something you feel like trying, just do it. Don't make up excuses for why now isn't the best time. Yesterday I rented a kayak and crossed through the islands in the Stockholm archipelago for the very first time. I moved here 13 years ago and I can't believe it's took me so long to do this! 
Good side with the story though: It's never to late.
2:30 in the morning and the sun is slowly rising over the Baltic Sea. I just love those bright summer nights. ❤️
Spent the whole day yesterday in the beautiful Nacka nature reserve just outside Stockholm. It's amazing how fast you can get out in nature, even in such a big city as the capital of Sweden! From the stockholm central station it's less then a 30 minutes drive and with the metro it will go even faster!
Tried a new form of workout yesterday: I put my backpack on and cycled to the store for some grocery shopping. 15K and 15kg on my back surely made me feel both good and exhausted afterwards!

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