Everest Base Camp 2017


She’s been called ”the Mountain of dreams”. 8848 meter (29029 feet) above sea level she reaches up, higher than anything else on our planet. She lies on the border between north east Nepal and west China (Tibet). I talk about l Sagarmāthā, Chomolungma – Mount Everest, the highest mountain in the world.

A modest dream for many, but also a dream that rarely comes true. Lack of knowledge and resources stops it. Getting to the top of the mountain is an adventure that requires big efforts, both physically, mentally and financially. It’s said, that from the moment you make the decision to climb it, till you been standing on the top and then are back home again, you have to count on years in preparations and tens (close to a hundred) of thousands of dollars in expenses.

A minor, but still great adventure if you want to experience the highest mountain in the world, is to hike to the base of it – to Everest Base Camp. This is where the people who aim for the top have their base camp, at 5364 m (17598 ft), about 3500 meter (11400 ft) lowers than the actual summit. To this place goes a well attended hiking trail that tens of thousands of people trek every year. In about two weeks you can walk from the small village of Lukla, through winding mountain trails and breathtaking suspension bridges, up to Base Camp and back again. But the dream about a trip like this, is still something that remains a just a dream for many. Why?

Picture from Google maps.

I think it’s about the same thing that stops people that dreams about reaching the summit. The lack of knowledge and money. If you google ”Mount Everest” some of the top results will contain scandalous headlines like ”four climbers dead on Everest”. This creates fear for the mountain and many might feel that an adventure to this place is a bit to extreme. Sure, climbing Mount Everest is not an easy thing to do and unfortunately people do die on the mountain. But the trek to Base Camp is much easier. You walk between mountain villages and there’s no dangerous obstacles as glaciers along the trail, just a steady uphill. But this isn’t something that make headlines in the tabloids, where the main purpose is to make people worried and terrified.

For those who doesn’t care a about the headlines it might instead be the financial part that puts an end to the dream. To go here with an organized group cost about $2000-4500 and that rarely includes the flight tickets to/from Nepal. This can be quite a large sum, especially for those who haven’t much money left after the bills are paid by the end of the month. When I first heard this numbers, I asked myself what it was that made the price so high. How could it be so expensive to use your own body as transportation?

One part of the cost that is usually included in the organised treks, is the guides and sherpas that carrying your stuff up the mountain for you. But after doing some research, I found out that on a hike up to Base Camp, the most common thing is that you both eat and sleep in some the many lodges/teahouses that you pass along the trail. This mean that you don’t have to carry either food or tent. The trail up to Base Camp is also very easy and simple to follow. People who’s been there says that it’s almost impossible to get lost. Would I really need sherpas and guides then? Is there any other expenses I can get rid of or lower? And how complicated is it, really?

When I started this website about a year ago, one of my biggest driving forces was to inspire and motivate others to dare to get out in the wilderness. To prove and show that it really isn’t that complicated and also how insignificant experience is, I decided to, without even a year of hiking experience, hike the Pacific Crest Trail. 2660 miles from Mexico to Canada along the the highest mountain in the continental U.S., Mount Whitney.  Now I wanna do the same thing with Everest Base Camp – but this time I also wanna show that money shouldn’t stop us from letting our dreams come true! Even if you don’t get the biggest pay check by the end of the month, it shouldn’t stop us to fulfill our dreams, even if the dream includes the highest mountain in the world.

I will therefor, without any sponsors or co-financers, in less than a year save money to, in October 2017, go to Nepal and start my hike towards the foot of Everest, to Everest Base Camp. I will do the hike completely on my own, without any friends, sherpas or guides and with as little money as possible. I want to examine the conditions to do this trek on your own and how you can do it with as little money as possible. This to inspire others, but also to share the information about how you can do it yourself, for those who want to start making there own dream come true och go there themselves.

Will it work out? Will I reach the base camp? Follow me here on the blog during my preparations, and on the way up to Everest Base Camp this fall!

….on my way back from Base Camp I will though meet an organised group and join them for a few days when they aim to climb the Lobuche Peak (6119m). This because I really can’t resist to take the chance and summiting a peak myself while I’m in the Himalayas, the worlds greatest mountain range and that is something I can’t do by myself. I’m usually a spokesperson for doing adventures on your own, but you must use your mind while in nature. Some things are just to dangerous to do on your own, like this, especially if you like me have very limited climbing- and mounaitneering experience. But I also want to hear what it’s like to do this trip with a group and I want to show that there’s alternatives to doing this trip by yourself. I know that many others do prefer to pay a little extra to have someone arrange the whole thing for you and I want to meet people who have decided to do it this way and listen to what they have to say about it and what encouraged them to do this trip. 

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Me who runs the blog

... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

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I dit it! Lobuche Peak, 6119m ✔️❤️ One thing that I've learned through my adventures is how much of our physical strength that is actually mental. We think that we can't do something and therefor we can't. We give up before we have even tried. If we only would dare to try we would be surprised how much we're actually capable of.

One thing that I really wanted to do during my trip to Nepal was climbing a mountain. I picked Lobuche Peak at 6119m, just around the corner from Everest. I had never climbed such a big mountain before, but I really wanted to give it a try.

Unfortunately, 5 weeks before my trip started I had to go through surgery for cervical cell changes. It was not a big thing, but I was told I wasn't aloud to do any kind of training the before my trip in order for my body to heal properly.

This was of course devastating for me. To be able to handle the lower amount of oxygen over 6000m I was in the middle of a really intense workout schedule.  Now I had to stop.

I asked myself what should I do. Should I cancel the plans of climbing the mountain and forget about my dream? I decided not to. I wanted to see how far my own will could take me up the mountain even if I wasn't in the best physical shape.

And this morning I got the answer - my will took me all the way to the top! Such an amazing feeling standing there realizing how much I'm actually capable of, just if I put my mind to it! 💥
The view from this mornings climb to Kala Patthar, 5550 m, was totally amazing! A 360 view over all the peaks around during the time of sunrise. 
In this pic: one of my absolute favorites, Ama Dablam. ❤️ A good advice for all of you planning doing Kala Patthar yourself: dress warm and don't forget extra warm socks and gloves. It's freezing before the sun hits you (which might take a while since it rises behind the highest mountain in the world)!
I made it!!! 💟
All the way from Jiri through the Nepalese jungle, up and pass Lukla and finally through the rocky landscape to Everest Base Camp at 5364m! This i did all on my own, without any help from porters or guides or even the company of friends. 12 days, 182 km and I don't now how many meters of altitudes in total. Feel so proud and happy right now! ❤️💪 But my adventure isn't over yet. Tomorrow I will climb Kala Patthar and the day after that I'll head up to Lobuche high camp from where I will attempt to summit the over 6000m Lobuche Peak! Check out my Instagram story feed to see how it goes! 😘
Today I felt the altitude in a bad way for the first time. After reaching the village of Lobuche my head started aching real bad, but after some rest, water and a short hike up to higher altitude and then back down again I felt much better! It's amazing how your body can adapt if you just gives it time. ❤️
Pic from the short hike with rests of the Khumbu Glacier in the background.
Tomorrow I'm heading up for base camp! 🏔️
Today I walked higher than I ever been before, up to 5090m! Everything went well (even though it was hard) and it feels very good since Everest Base Camp is "only" about 274 m higher!
Now I'm back in Dingboche at 4400m. The hike today was part of the acclimatizing process where you slowly expose your body to higher altitudes. By going up, then back down again your body will find it easier next time you go higher.
Pic from the top of the climb today with views over Ama Dablam.
Today's hike up to Dingboche was very different than the hike yesterday. The clouds were low, the rain kept pouring down and the huge mountains that's surrounds me did not show all. But it was still so beautiful!
As the trail kept getting higher and higher, the landscape changed as well, from green rhododendron forests to rocky and sandy with less and less vegetation. It certainly feels that I'm getting higher. Now at 4400m I'm close to higher than I ever been before.
These guys are so strong. I sometimes struggling with my 15 kg+ back pack (even though I start to get use to it by now) but the porters here carry well over 50 kg, often walking in just plain sandals.
It makes me think about how worried we westerners are about weight and that we have "the right" kind of gear. It seems pretty clear that what you have works just fine - so don't let the lack of proper gear stopping you from getting out in nature!
Getting up early is definitely something that will be rewarding at the Everest Base Camp Trek. You will get clear skies = beautiful views before the clouds comes in, the temperature will be cooler and you can also get the trail for yourself if you're lucky!
Today's hike up to Tengboche was really something else, this is hiking at its best! ☀️
The Everest Base Camp Trek is hiked by tens of thousands each year. The trail between Jiri and Lukla only by a thousand. And it really was something else. I didn't meet many hikers at all, but one of the days I was happy to get company by this cutie. She followed me for hours before she suddenly decided to go back to where she came from. A man told me she use to follow hikers to make sure they not get lost. ❤️

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