Everest Base Camp 2017


She’s been called ”the Mountain of dreams”. 8848 meter (29029 feet) above sea level she reaches up, higher than anything else on our planet. She lies on the border between north east Nepal and west China (Tibet). I talk about l Sagarmāthā, Chomolungma – Mount Everest, the highest mountain in the world.

A modest dream for many, but also a dream that rarely comes true. Lack of knowledge and resources stops it. Getting to the top of the mountain is an adventure that requires big efforts, both physically, mentally and financially. It’s said, that from the moment you make the decision to climb it, till you been standing on the top and then are back home again, you have to count on years in preparations and tens (close to a hundred) of thousands of dollars in expenses.

A minor, but still great adventure if you want to experience the highest mountain in the world, is to hike to the base of it – to Everest Base Camp. This is where the people who aim for the top have their base camp, at 5364 m (17598 ft), about 3500 meter (11400 ft) lowers than the actual summit. To this place goes a well attended hiking trail that tens of thousands of people trek every year. In about two weeks you can walk from the small village of Lukla, through winding mountain trails and breathtaking suspension bridges, up to Base Camp and back again. But the dream about a trip like this, is still something that remains a just a dream for many. Why?

Picture from Google maps.

I think it’s about the same thing that stops people that dreams about reaching the summit. The lack of knowledge and money. If you google ”Mount Everest” some of the top results will contain scandalous headlines like ”four climbers dead on Everest”. This creates fear for the mountain and many might feel that an adventure to this place is a bit to extreme. Sure, climbing Mount Everest is not an easy thing to do and unfortunately people do die on the mountain. But the trek to Base Camp is much easier. You walk between mountain villages and there’s no dangerous obstacles as glaciers along the trail, just a steady uphill. But this isn’t something that make headlines in the tabloids, where the main purpose is to make people worried and terrified.

For those who doesn’t care a about the headlines it might instead be the financial part that puts an end to the dream. To go here with an organized group cost about $2000-4500 and that rarely includes the flight tickets to/from Nepal. This can be quite a large sum, especially for those who haven’t much money left after the bills are paid by the end of the month. When I first heard this numbers, I asked myself what it was that made the price so high. How could it be so expensive to use your own body as transportation?

One part of the cost that is usually included in the organised treks, is the guides and sherpas that carrying your stuff up the mountain for you. But after doing some research, I found out that on a hike up to Base Camp, the most common thing is that you both eat and sleep in some the many lodges/teahouses that you pass along the trail. This mean that you don’t have to carry either food or tent. The trail up to Base Camp is also very easy and simple to follow. People who’s been there says that it’s almost impossible to get lost. Would I really need sherpas and guides then? Is there any other expenses I can get rid of or lower? And how complicated is it, really?

When I started this website about a year ago, one of my biggest driving forces was to inspire and motivate others to dare to get out in the wilderness. To prove and show that it really isn’t that complicated and also how insignificant experience is, I decided to, without even a year of hiking experience, hike the Pacific Crest Trail. 2660 miles from Mexico to Canada along the the highest mountain in the continental U.S., Mount Whitney.  Now I wanna do the same thing with Everest Base Camp – but this time I also wanna show that money shouldn’t stop us from letting our dreams come true! Even if you don’t get the biggest pay check by the end of the month, it shouldn’t stop us to fulfill our dreams, even if the dream includes the highest mountain in the world.

I will therefor, without any sponsors or co-financers, in less than a year save money to, in October 2017, go to Nepal and start my hike towards the foot of Everest, to Everest Base Camp. I will do the hike completely on my own, without any friends, sherpas or guides and with as little money as possible. I want to examine the conditions to do this trek on your own and how you can do it with as little money as possible. This to inspire others, but also to share the information about how you can do it yourself, for those who want to start making there own dream come true och go there themselves.

Will it work out? Will I reach the base camp? Follow me here on the blog during my preparations, and on the way up to Everest Base Camp this fall!

….on my way back from Base Camp I will though meet an organised group and join them for a few days when they aim to climb the Lobuche Peak (6119m). This because I really can’t resist to take the chance and summiting a peak myself while I’m in the Himalayas, the worlds greatest mountain range and that is something I can’t do by myself. I’m usually a spokesperson for doing adventures on your own, but you must use your mind while in nature. Some things are just to dangerous to do on your own, like this, especially if you like me have very limited climbing- and mounaitneering experience. But I also want to hear what it’s like to do this trip with a group and I want to show that there’s alternatives to doing this trip by yourself. I know that many others do prefer to pay a little extra to have someone arrange the whole thing for you and I want to meet people who have decided to do it this way and listen to what they have to say about it and what encouraged them to do this trip. 

Me who runs the blog

... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

Instagram

Someone once asked me if I didn't loose track of the days hiking the PCT. My answer was 'No, it was actually the opposite, I could easily recall the days, even months back. We just didn't call them by the name we use in "normal life". In the wild we simply referred to them after what made them special.' This is for example a pic from "Fog Day" (or as all the others would call it, May 6) last year. 
PCT, mile ~426
How do you prepare for a hike on a trail you never been on before? Read about my second step in my preparation for Everest Base Camp trek: Setting a time schedule, at wilderness-stories.com (link in bio)
Pic from PCT mile ~1973, in one of the weirdest landscapes I've ever seen: the lava fields in Oregon.
Passing the 2600-mile marker on the PCT was a big thing for me. Being the last 100-marker with only 50 mile to go it was clear that I was gonna complete the entire trail. Now I've seen that I've also passed 2600 followers here on Instagram! I'm so happy for all of you and that you want to follow me on my adventures! Hearing from you, meeting you and hear your own stories is what keeps me going - so from the bottom I'm my heart, THANK YOU! ❤️
One year ago today, on June 5th 2016, I summited my very first mountain, Mount Whitney on a side trail of the PCT. With its 14505 ft / 4421 meter it counts as the highest mountain in the "lower 48" (the U.S. except the 2 states of Alaska and Hawaii). It was a bit tricky in the snow, but we all made it! I know there's a lot more snow in the Sierras this year so I wish all the thruhikers of 2017 all the best and also want to send them a reminder to stay safe. If Whitney feels to risky when you pass it, you can always do it later. The mountains won't go anywhere. ❤️
If you have a dream or something you really want to do, it can be a little bit scary to make it happen. We make up ideas about why now isn't the right time, why it's better to do it later. But the truth is that there's no better time than right now. Don't push forward your dreams. Make them happen. ☀️
Me after my first full day of kayaking last week. It was a bit scary and on this pic I'm super tired but so happy at the same time because I finally did it! And it was so much fun!
If there's something you feel like trying, just do it. Don't make up excuses for why now isn't the best time. Yesterday I rented a kayak and crossed through the islands in the Stockholm archipelago for the very first time. I moved here 13 years ago and I can't believe it's took me so long to do this! 
Good side with the story though: It's never to late.
2:30 in the morning and the sun is slowly rising over the Baltic Sea. I just love those bright summer nights. ❤️
Spent the whole day yesterday in the beautiful Nacka nature reserve just outside Stockholm. It's amazing how fast you can get out in nature, even in such a big city as the capital of Sweden! From the stockholm central station it's less then a 30 minutes drive and with the metro it will go even faster!
Tried a new form of workout yesterday: I put my backpack on and cycled to the store for some grocery shopping. 15K and 15kg on my back surely made me feel both good and exhausted afterwards!

Subscribe to new posts on Wilderness Stories!



Supporters