PCT – Gear List


When I tell people about my hike along the Pacific Crest Trail, many of the questions I get is about my gear. I can feel that it’s sad that most questions circles around this, especially since I think that a long list of what gear you ”need” is what stops most people to set out on a hike in the first place. It just seems like to much of a project.

I have therefor long hesitated wether I should publish my gear list or not. But also because I don’t want to affect what anyone buy and what you should bring is so individual. You have to adapt your pack after yourself and your own needs. Is comfort important to you or do you care more about having a light pack as possible? Only you can decide. Of all the things I brought with me there’s also much that I’ve just bought by coincidence, it is not sure that they’re the best.

But I can of course understand the questions and why people are curios about it. Especially if they been thinking about hiking the trail themself. At this very moment, many are preparing for their own hike along the Pacific Crest Trail this year and I’ve started to get some questions from them, for example about what gear I had. Therefore, I have now decided to put up my gear list! I have not written witch models I used here, but if you click on the blue marked products, you are getting linked directly to them. At the bottom of the page, I’ve also listed some tips on how to do put together your own gear list!

GEAR LIST PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

To wear

Carry and living

Clothes

Hygiene

Electronics / Various gear

  • Hot spot
  • Zip-lock bag with valuables (passport, cash, visa card, hiking permits) 
  • Paperback

Food

For certain areas

…And for those of you who wonders about the weight of my back, I can honestly say that I have no clue. I never weight my pack before I started and since I felt that the numbers on the scale meant nothing to me it didn’t matter. What did matter was that I felt good about how it felt on my back and with what I was brining. That was something the numbers couldn’t tell.

Tips to put together your own gear list:

Don’t use a big pack. Regardless what size your pack is you’re gonna fill it up to max. A smaller pack makes it easier to ditch all the ”just-in-case-things”. I made it through the U.S. with just a 45-55L pack.

Forget about the weight! Feel it instead. Pack what you think you need and feel how it is on your back. If it’s to heavy – try to put out some stuff that you can do without. If it feels ok, start with it and then start to adjust it later on the hike.

Listen to yourself. Ask for tips but remember to listen to yourself about what you want and/or need. If there’s someting you feel is important for you and your experience, bring it even if it will cause som extra weight. For me the comfort in camp is extremely important so I brought a pair of camp shoes, something a lot of others didn’t.

Evalutate. After a while on trail you can start to go through your pack and take out the things you don’t use or only used once. Some things you’re gonna want to keep anyway, but keep in mind that with a lighter pack, the hike will go much easier. With some experience you will find it easier to decide what to keep and what to pack out, what you really need or not. Send home or donate what you don’t need. Repeat this multiple times.

Good luck!

 

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2 kommentarer

  • Carmen
    29 januari, 2017 at 18:06

    Thank you for sharing your gear list! I’m going to hike the PCT this year and read a lot of blogs which helps me preparing. We’re you happy with your 13000 mAh powerbank or would you recommend taking less? Did you often use the hot spots?

    • lindaakerberg
      1 februari, 2017 at 21:53

      Thats awesome, I’m so happy for you! You know that the hardest thing is to make de decision to actually do it so you’re doing great already! 😉
      The 13000 mAh was perfect for me. I just used it to charge my iPhone between stops and I always felt safe having it. I don’t see any reason to bring a smaller one since there not much to save on volume or weight if you go smaller. Better to feel safe.
      I used the hotspots maybe one or two times. The thing is that when you only have one or two you always think about saving it if it might be colder tomorrow. 🙂 I think I could have done without them too though. A small nalgene water bottle is a better option I think if you’re worried about the cold. You can put boiling water in it and then keep it in your sleeping bag as a radiator.

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... is Linda Åkerberg. I'm a 32 years old photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. Read more about me here

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Someone once asked me if I didn't loose track of the days hiking the PCT. My answer was 'No, it was actually the opposite, I could easily recall the days, even months back. We just didn't call them by the name we use in "normal life". In the wild we simply referred to them after what made them special.' This is for example a pic from "Fog Day" (or as all the others would call it, May 6) last year. 
PCT, mile ~426
How do you prepare for a hike on a trail you never been on before? Read about my second step in my preparation for Everest Base Camp trek: Setting a time schedule, at wilderness-stories.com (link in bio)
Pic from PCT mile ~1973, in one of the weirdest landscapes I've ever seen: the lava fields in Oregon.
Passing the 2600-mile marker on the PCT was a big thing for me. Being the last 100-marker with only 50 mile to go it was clear that I was gonna complete the entire trail. Now I've seen that I've also passed 2600 followers here on Instagram! I'm so happy for all of you and that you want to follow me on my adventures! Hearing from you, meeting you and hear your own stories is what keeps me going - so from the bottom I'm my heart, THANK YOU! ❤️
One year ago today, on June 5th 2016, I summited my very first mountain, Mount Whitney on a side trail of the PCT. With its 14505 ft / 4421 meter it counts as the highest mountain in the "lower 48" (the U.S. except the 2 states of Alaska and Hawaii). It was a bit tricky in the snow, but we all made it! I know there's a lot more snow in the Sierras this year so I wish all the thruhikers of 2017 all the best and also want to send them a reminder to stay safe. If Whitney feels to risky when you pass it, you can always do it later. The mountains won't go anywhere. ❤️
If you have a dream or something you really want to do, it can be a little bit scary to make it happen. We make up ideas about why now isn't the right time, why it's better to do it later. But the truth is that there's no better time than right now. Don't push forward your dreams. Make them happen. ☀️
Me after my first full day of kayaking last week. It was a bit scary and on this pic I'm super tired but so happy at the same time because I finally did it! And it was so much fun!
If there's something you feel like trying, just do it. Don't make up excuses for why now isn't the best time. Yesterday I rented a kayak and crossed through the islands in the Stockholm archipelago for the very first time. I moved here 13 years ago and I can't believe it's took me so long to do this! 
Good side with the story though: It's never to late.
2:30 in the morning and the sun is slowly rising over the Baltic Sea. I just love those bright summer nights. ❤️
Spent the whole day yesterday in the beautiful Nacka nature reserve just outside Stockholm. It's amazing how fast you can get out in nature, even in such a big city as the capital of Sweden! From the stockholm central station it's less then a 30 minutes drive and with the metro it will go even faster!
Tried a new form of workout yesterday: I put my backpack on and cycled to the store for some grocery shopping. 15K and 15kg on my back surely made me feel both good and exhausted afterwards!

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